Preserving the Yellow Dog Watershed
in its most natural state for the use of the public,
now, and for the benefit of future generations.

Fundraising,news

Fall 2014 Howl Newsletter

10 Oct , 2014  

Fall2014_cover

The leaves have changed here in the Upper Midwest, and you can hear whispers of winter when you step out onto your doorstep. Days are getting shorter and the air is much cooler, but don’t worry, reading the latest newsletter from Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve is sure to warm your heart. It is full of good deeds made by wonderful people dedicated to protecting places they love. Take a look at the online version of the Fall 2014 Version 18, Issue 2 and consider renewing your membership or contributing to our several funds here to help keep us going. More…

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Volunteer Stream Monitoring Fall Training Session

27 Sep , 2014  

Volunteers sorting macroinvertebrates for the YDWP spring volunteer stream monitoring training day 2014.

Big Bay, MI – The Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve is looking for people who love the outdoors and are interested in volunteering and learning more about stream ecology. Volunteers will help collect water quality information for the Yellow Dog and Salmon Trout Rivers alongside YDWP staff this fall and no prior experience is necessary. This project is part of the Volunteer Stream Monitoring Program established by Micorps (Michigan Clean Water Corps) which provides technical assistance, training and grants to volunteer stream monitors and watershed groups in Michigan.

The Volunteer Stream Monitoring project will consist of eighteen sites that are sampled twice a year, once in spring and once in fall throughout the Yellow Dog and Salmon Trout River watersheds. Stream monitoring for each site will be scheduled and all sites will be completed in about 2-4 weeks. Volunteers can pick days that they can help out with the actual monitoring, weather dependent. The training day of the project will take place this fall at 10 a.m. on Saturday September 27, 2014. The day of training will start at the Powell Township School (Big Bay) in the board room. After this, the volunteers will go out in the field for lunch (please bring a bag lunch) and begin in-stream training at a site until 3:00 p.m. Participants should bring waders or tall boots in they have them, but it is not required. Participants should also come prepared for outdoor weather in the UP!

Once again, no experience is necessary. The mission of YDWP is to preserve and protect the Yellow Dog River in its most natural state, for now, and for the benefit of future generations. If you are interested in helping us with this project please reserve your spot by calling (906) 345-9223 or email christy@yellowdogwatershed.org.

Volunteers and a youth adventure club learning about volunteer stream monitoring with the Yellow Dog.

Volunteers and a youth adventure club learning about volunteer stream monitoring with the Yellow Dog.

 

 

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news,Sulfide Mining,Water Quality

Marquette County Road Commission in Violation of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act

14 Aug , 2014  

Wetland receiving unlawful sediment deposits and unnatural turbidity as a result of road construction.

On August 4, 2014 the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Water Resources Division issued a Violation Notice to the Marquette County Road Commission for an unlawful discharge of sediment and turbid water into a wetland ravine, tributary, and the East Branch Salmon Trout River during the creation of the haul road for Lundin Eagle Mine. The unlawful discharge was created when excavation for the new County Road AAA road corridor reached groundwater level and water began to flow out of the construction site, down slope, and into nearby waterways.

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Citizen Action,Land Preservation,Water Quality

Invaders

8 Aug , 2014  

Wetland area with heavy swamp thistle infestation.

We never really decided on a name for ourselves:  Thistle Exterminators, Thistle Destroyers,   The Thistle Queens, to name a few.  We also never really thought we would still be working on this project.

In 2009, former YDWP director, Emily Whittaker, received a grant from the National Forest Foundation to do an invasive plant survey in the McCormick National Wilderness Area where the Yellow Dog River begins and where it flows for its first several miles. To our surprise, we discovered a host of invasives: yellow and orange hawk weed, birdsfoot trefoil, knapweed, and European swamp thistles. Of all these invasives, the swamp thistle was predominant.   More…

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Education & Outreach,news,programs,Water Quality

Keeping an Eye on Total Phosphorus in Lake Independence

22 Jul , 2014  

Volunteer leader Xavier Donajkowski steering the boat out onto Lake Independence to collect water quality information in 2014.

Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve is in the midst of the 2014 sampling season for the Michigan Clean Water Corps (MiCorps) Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program. YDWP have been collecting data since 2010, and we have historical clarity data from 1974-1982. We intend to continue collecting information about Lake Independence water quality through this program indefinitely. The program is directed by a partnership between the MDEQ and the Michigan Lake and Stream Association. The goal is to provide water quality data for lakes in the state of Michigan in a cost-effective way. The data can be analyzed to observe long-term trends and will also be used to educate lake residents about lake ecology and potential threats to the health of their lake. More…

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Citizen Action,Education & Outreach,news

A Rare Song

1 Jul , 2014  

Nancy Moran checking out birds on the Yellow Dog Plains through her camera lens. Photo by Rochelle Dale

I stuffed my picnic breakfast and snacks into my pack with the binoculars and camera, grabbed my hiking boots and thermos of coffee and ran to the truck. I was due to meet Nancy and Jeremiah Moran on County Road 510 at 7:00 a.m. to help with the annual Kirtland’s Warbler survey on the Yellow Dog Plains. Since the birds like their early morning singing times, it was important not to be late.

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