Preserving the Yellow Dog Watershed
in its most natural state for the use of the public,
now, and for the benefit of future generations.

Education & Outreach,Sulfide Mining

October In the Yellow Dog Watershed

10 Oct , 2014  

By Rochelle Dale

Octobers on the Yellow Dog always remind me of Aunt Mildred and my mom and dad. They would have been in their seventies at the time, back in the early 1990s.  We were driving along the Toboggan road that runs parallel with the river when Mildred pointed out a young spruce tree covered in the yellows and reds of fallen maple leaves. She said,   “Why, that’s as pretty as any Christmas tree I ever did see. “ More…

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news,Sulfide Mining,Water Quality

Marquette County Road Commission in Violation of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act

14 Aug , 2014  

On August 4, 2014 the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Water Resources Division issued a Violation Notice to the Marquette County Road Commission for an unlawful discharge of sediment and turbid water into a wetland ravine, tributary, and the East Branch Salmon Trout River during the creation of the haul road for Lundin Eagle Mine. The unlawful discharge was created when excavation for the new County Road AAA road corridor reached groundwater level and water began to flow out of the construction site, down slope, and into nearby waterways.

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Citizen Action,Land Preservation,Water Quality

Invaders

8 Aug , 2014  

We never really decided on a name for ourselves:  Thistle Exterminators, Thistle Destroyers,   The Thistle Queens, to name a few.  We also never really thought we would still be working on this project.

In 2009, former YDWP director, Emily Whittaker, received a grant from the National Forest Foundation to do an invasive plant survey in the McCormick National Wilderness Area where the Yellow Dog River begins and where it flows for its first several miles. To our surprise, we discovered a host of invasives: yellow and orange hawk weed, birdsfoot trefoil, knapweed, and European swamp thistles. Of all these invasives, the swamp thistle was predominant.   More…

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